Dr. Gregory V. Lowry

Walter J. Blenko Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University Deputy Director of the National Science Foundation/Environmental Protection Agency Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT) Principal Investigator at the Nano for Agriculturally Relevant Materials (NanoFARM)

Synchrotron X-Ray Methods to Characterize Nanomaterial Behavior in Complex Environmental and Biological Systems

Dr. Gregory V. Lowry
Walter J. Blenko Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University
Deputy Director of the National Science Foundation/Environmental Protection Agency Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT)
Principal Investigator at the Nano for Agriculturally Relevant Materials (NanoFARM)

Monday, Dec. 3, 2018 | 6:00 p.m.

McArthur Engineering Addition, Jose Milton Leadership Hall, Room 202
1251 Memorial Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Abstract
One exciting property of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is their enhanced reactivity compared to larger particles of the same composition. However, this remarkable trait also means that ENMs can rapidly transform in complex environmental and biological media. Synchrotron X-ray-based methods can be used to track the chemical speciation of ENMs directly in complex samples. Several methods also provide highly spatially resolved information on ENM speciation to determine both the spatial distribution and transformation of ENMs in complex samples like plants. Gaining a better understanding of the dynamic processes that affect ENM properties (and the time scales of those transformations) is needed to improve our assessment of their fate and effects (beneficial or deleterious). This lecture will discuss the X-ray methods available, the predominant transformations of ENMs in environmental and biological media, and the implications of those transformations on our ability to predict the performance of ENMs in environmental and agricultural settings. Examples will include sulfidation and phosphorylation reactions, dissolution, and changes in organic coating properties as these have been shown to significantly affect ENM interactions with plants.

Greg V. Lowry, PhD, is the Walter J. Blenko Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the deputy director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT), and an associate editor of Environmental Science: Nano and Nature: Scientific Data. His research aims to safely harness the unique properties of engineered nanomaterials for making water treatment and crop agriculture more sustainable. Recent work aims to understand how a nanomaterial’s properties and environmental conditions influence its fate in soils, nanomaterial-plant interactions, nutrient uptake efficiency and crop disease management. He has authored more than 140 peer-reviewed journal articles (H index=63). He has served as principal investigator (PI) or co-PI on grants from the NSF, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and from industry. He currently serves on the board of directors of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP) and recently served on the U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board (environmental engineering committee). He is a member of the National Academy of Science Committee on Science Breakthroughs 2030: A Strategy for Food and Agricultural Research, and served on the National Research Council Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental Health and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials. Lowry holds a BS in chemical engineering from the University of California at Davis, an MS from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a PhD in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University.

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Dr. Gregory V. Lowry

Walter J. Blenko Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University Deputy Director of the National Science Foundation/Environmental Protection Agency Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT) Principal Investigator at the Nano for Agriculturally Relevant Materials (NanoFARM)

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